Photos of Old India and its culture

These are a collection of rare photos of the life of Indians in early 20th century .

These are a collection of rare photos of the life of Indians in early 20th century and their proud culture .

Imperial Airways London

The Imperial Airways ‘Hanno’ Hadley Page passenger airplane carries the England to India air mail, stopping in Sharjah to refuel.


Jama Masjid mosque

An aerial view of Jama Masjid mosque in Delhi , built between 1650 and 1658.


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A group from Vaishnava, a sect founded by a Hindu mystic. His followers are called Gosvami-maharajahs.

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Women gather at a party in Mumbai ( Bombay ) in 1910.


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A rare view of the President’s palace and the Parliament building in New Delhi


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A group of Dancing or nautch girls began performing with their elaborate costumes and jewelry.


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The Grand Trunk Road , built by Sher Shah Suri, was the main trade route from Calcutta to Kabul .


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A British man gets a pedicure from an Indian servant.

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The daughter of an Indian maharajah seated on a panther she shot, sometime during 1920s.

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Lord Macaulay’s address to the British parliament in 1835.




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Kosi River Flood – After effects

They used their livestocks to fulfill their daily requirements in terms of nutritional food and milk. But now having lost all their fertile land, they are left with their livestocks to make their ends meet as well as to look after their nutritional requirements.

In 2009 Bihar saw one of the worst floods in recent history.  Crops were devastated, lives were lost. Thousands of crore rupees were spent in relief and rehabilitation. Months have gone by and people have forgotten about the tragedy. What has followed after the floods as an aftermath is a 2nd wave of destruction through poverty, malnutrition, slavery, trafficking, etc..  People have failed to understand the enormous after effects of this flood.

Farmers who had land have lost all their crop. They are debt ridden now. Most have them have lost their shelter and savings they had. This situation is creating many interesting phenomenons in social environment of the region . Milk collection centers have  registered exponential growth in their collection stats. This is more confined to the regions which were affected by floods. But it wold be Naive to bask in the glory of this fact. The reason behind this is a very sad state of affair of a poverty struck Indian family.

Families before the flood used to sell their produce and make their ends meet. They used their livestocks to fulfill their daily requirements in terms of nutritional food and milk. But now having lost all their fertile land, they are left with their livestocks to make their ends meet as well as to look after their nutritional requirements. Sadly having failed to get any jobs, they are forced to sell the milk produced by the cows and buffaloes and sell it to the distribution centers. Even though it has increased the collection, this has resulted in malnutrition of their children and the whole family. They have been forced to survive on raw rice without the opportunity to buy the  vegetables due to lack of money. This is having major repercussion in terms of   overall health index of the region. People are falling prey to the diseases and anti social elements are taking advantages of this my inciting human trafficking and slavery. When the rest of the India is couping with 9% GDP growth, this part of the region is going back to colonial times. Unless people understand the need for long term rehabilitation this unfortunate incidents will continue to take place.




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Deepavali – Darkness to Light

These frames were captured with high exposure time and still hand. This resulted in spectacular formations of designs and colors.

These frames were captured with high exposure time and still hand. This resulted in spectacular formations of designs and colors.

Story of Sir Winston Churchill & Sir Alexander Fleming

Story of Sir Winston Churchill & Sir Alexander Fleming

His name was Fleming, and he was a poor Scottish farmer. One day, while trying to make a living for his family, he heard a cry for help coming from a nearby bog. He dropped his tools and ran to the bog.

There, mired to his waist in black muck, was a terrified boy, screaming and struggling to free himself. Farmer Fleming saved the lad from what could have been a slow and terrifying death.

The next day, a fancy carriage pulled up to the Scotsman’s sparse surroundings. An elegantly dressed nobleman stepped out and introduced himself as the father of the boy Farmer Fleming had saved.’I want to repay you,’ said the nobleman. ‘You saved my son’s life

‘No, I can’t accept payment for what I did,’ the Scottish farmer replied waving off the offer. At that moment, the farmer’s own son came to the door of the family hovel.

‘Is that your son?’ the nobleman asked.
‘Yes,’ the farmer replied proudly.

‘I’ll make you a deal. Let me provide him with the level of education my own son will enjoy If the lad is anything like his father, he’ll no doubt grow to be a man we both will be proud of.’ And that he did.

Farmer Fleming’s son attended the very best schools and in time, graduated from St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London, and went on to become known throughout the world as the noted Sir Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of Penicillin.

Years afterward, the same nobleman’s son who was saved from the bog was stricken with pneumonia.

What saved his life this time? Penicillin..

The name of the nobleman? Lord Randolph Churchill .. His son’s name?

Sir Winston Churchill.