Pictures of partial solar eclipse at bangalore, India

These are the series of photographs taken at Bangalore, India.

These are the series of photographs taken at Bengalore, India. I took these pictures with an olyumpus FE-310 with solar filters. It was takes at an ISO value of 640 and with maximum lense and digital zoom. Also frame rate is at 1/50.

A planetary nebula within a cluster

The planetary nebula NGC 2818 in its parent star cluster. Both the nebula, a luminous cloud of matter ejected from a dying star

The planetary nebula NGC 2818 in its parent star cluster. Both the nebula, a luminous cloud of matter ejected from a dying star, and the cluster are about 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Pyxis. Such a loosely bound star cluster would usually disband before one of its stars threw off a nebula, making NGC 2818 a relatively rare sight. This composite, false-color image, requiring two hours of exposure time on Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, was made by assigning colors to different emission wavelengths: red for nitrogen, green for hydrogen and blue for oxygen.

Manasa Gangothri, University of Mysore

Established about ninety years ago, the first university in Karnataka and one of the earliest established universities in the country, Mysore University is known for its innovative academic initiatives like Third Sector Research Centre and I-School.

Established about ninety years ago, the first university in Karnataka and one of the earliest established universities in the country, Mysore University is known for its innovative academic initiatives like Third Sector Research Centre and I-School.

Founded in 1916, Mysore University has five constituent colleges in Mysore and two PG Centres in Hassan and Mandya. There are more than hundred affiliated colleges under the university’s jurisdiction, limited to Mysore, Mandya, Hassan and Chamarajanagara districts. The main campus, Manasa Gangothri, is located near Kukkarahalli, on the outskirts of Mysore.

Spread over seven hundred acres and developed in 1960,  Manasa Gangothri’s campus is best known for its peaceful ambience and academic environment. There are 37 PG departments and twelve research centres at this campus.

Manasa Gangothri is known to have been trodden by great  teachers who taught at the university. Renowned educationists and scholars like Dr Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan, Professors S Chandrashekar, C D Narasimhiah and K V Puttappa, are amongst the famous gurus.

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Naked-eye Gamma Ray Burst

A powerful gamma ray burst detected March 19th, 2008 by NASA’s Swift satellite has shattered the record for the most distant object that could be seen with the naked eye.

A powerful gamma ray burst detected March 19th, 2008 by NASA’s Swift satellite has shattered the record for the most distant object that could be seen with the naked eye.Swift’s Burst Alert Telescope picked up the burst at 2:12 a.m. EDT Gamma Ray Burst on March 19, 2008, and pinpointed the coordinates in the constellation Bootes.

Telescopes in space and on the ground quickly moved to observe the afterglow. The burst was named GRB 080319B and registered between 5 and 6 on the visual magnitude scale used by astronomers.the Very Large Telescope in Chile and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope in Texas measured the burst’s redshift at 0.94.

J C Bose and the Nobel Prize

In spite of all the constraints of limited space, equipment and funds, J C Bose, born exactly 150 years ago in Bangladesh, then part of India, carried out research in the area of the newly discovered Hertzian waves, the story of which goes back to Maxwell (1831-1879).

In spite of all the constraints of limited space, equipment and funds, J C Bose, born exactly 150 years ago in Bangladesh, then part of India, carried out research in the area of the newly discovered Hertzian waves, the story of which goes back to Maxwell (1831-1879). Prof. Bose, when he took up research, foresaw the possibility of exploiting the Hertzian waves for wireless communication which was unthinkable those days. All it needed, he thought, was to develop a method of receiving the message sent from a distance in the form of Hertzian waves.

By 1895, he did invent a gadget which could do the job. It is a quirk of fate that robbed Bose of getting the Nobel for the invention. The irony is that the award went to Marconi, in 1909 for the very same invention. The sordid story of this technological plagiarism was first brought to light by Prof A Banti of Italy and has been presented in detail in the proceedings of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (Vol. 86, No. 1, PP 259.85, January 1998). The gadget invented by Bose has been called a ‘Coherer’ and it consists of a container of loosely packed metal filings, which ordinarily conducts little current, but conducts quite a bit when Hertzian waves fall on it. The very year in which he invented it, he demonstrated, in a public lecture in Calcutta, how Hertzian waves could travel from his radiator kept in the lecture room to on other room 75 feet away where his gadget picked up enough electrical energy to ring a bell and fire a pistol. Some time in 1901, Lieutinent L Solari of the Royal Italian Navy, a childhood friend of Marconi, experimented with the detector device and presented it to Marconi who, then, applied for a British patent on the device. The Nobel awards men, it seems, were oblivious of the Royal Society records and were carried away by Marconi’s British patent and his much publicized demonstration of trans-Atlantic transmission of radio signals.

Credit : J R Lakshmana Rao
(The author is former president of Karnataka  Rajya Vijnana Parishat)