Chandrayaan-1 pictures

This is the picture of moon’s surface taken from lunar orbit by Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft’s Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) on November 15, 2008. Taken over the polar region of the moon, the picture shows many large and numerous small craters. The bright terrain on the lower left is the rim of 117 km wide Moretus crater.

This is the picture of moon’s surface taken from lunar orbit by Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft’s Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) on November 13, 2008. Taken over the equatorial region of the moon, the picture shows the uneven surface of the moon with numerous craters. On the lower left, part of the Torricelli crater is seen

Climbers find Yeti footprints in Nepal

Japanese climbers returning from a mountain in western Nepal said on Tuesday they had found footprints they think belonged to the abominable snowman or Yeti.

Japanese climbers returning from a mountain in western Nepal said on Tuesday they had found footprints they think belonged to the abominable snowman or Yeti.The climbers, equipped with long-lens cameras, video cameras and telescopes, said, however that they did not see or take any photographs of the creature.The Yeti is said to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and is largely regarded by the scientific community as a mythical creature.Yagihara, 61, said the creature’s footprints were found on snow at an altitude of about 4,800 metres in the Dhaulagiri mountain range in western Nepal.

Yagihara and his team, supported by Sherpas, spent six weeks on the lower reaches of the 7,661-metre (25,134-ft) Dhaulagiri IV looking for evidence of the beast’s existence.

Sherpas narrate tales of a wild hairy creature roaming the Himalayas, capturing the imagination of foreign climbers of Mount Everest since the 1920s.Those stories prompted many, including Sir Edmund Hillary, to carry out yeti hunts.

In August, two men in the United States claimed they had found the remains of a half-man, half-ape Bigfoot, which actually turned out to be a rubber gorilla suit.Some other climbers have also claimed to have found Yeti footprints, but no one has yet actually seen it or produced irrefutable proof.Yagihara, the manager of a mountain museum in Japan, said he believes the creature exists.

B N Raghunatharao: A legendary geologist

We are talking about Dr Raghunatharao, who was one of the first to identify the Mardihalli Pillow lavas (circa 2750 million years old) in Chitradurga district, which, subsequently, has been declared as a National Geological Monument by the Geological Survey of India (GSI).

He also identified banded ferruginous quartzite, volcanic bombs, volcanic chutes, volcanic plugs, ripple lava and other geological structures like the “subsidence caldera” in the Chitradurga region.

His work received public recognition in 1985, when Dr B P Radhakrishna, former director of mines and geology, Karnataka, published a paper in GSI Journal, highlighting the work done by Dr Raghunatharao.
Dr Raghunatharao conducted the geological survey of about 1,800 sq miles, walking on foot! He had mapped 1,200 sq miles of the area for his work on volcanic activity in Chitradurga schist belt. According to colleagues, the geological maps and studies made by him in 1953 are identical with satellite pictures taken after two decades. They have been confirmed by the work done in the area by other geologists in later years.
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India @ North Pole

India on Tuesday commissioned its permanent research base at the North Pole which will enable scientists to carry out studies on a range of subjects including climate change in one of the most cleanest environments on earth.

The research station Himadri was inaugurated by Earth Sciences Minister Kapil Sibal at Ny-Alesund, on the west coast of Spitsbergen, the largest island in the Svalbard archipelago of Norway.The research base in the North Pole comes three decades after India set up a permanent station at Dakshin Gangotri in Antarctica.

Two-third of Ny-Alesund, which is spread over 63,000 sq km, is permanently under ice, but the climate is mild in comparison to other areas near the North Pole. The mean temperature in the coldest month of February is minus 14 degrees while in the warmest month of July, it is five degrees Celsius.Owing to almost zero pollution, Arctic is generally considered by scientists to be better than Antarctica for a wide range of research activities.

Ancient trees found in mines

Tree (University of Bristol)Spectacular fossil forests have been found in the coal mines of Illinois by a US-UK team of researchers.The group reported one discovery last year, but has since identified a further five examples.The ancient vegetation – now turned to rock – is visible in the ceilings of mines covering thousands of hectares.These were among the first forests to evolve on the planet.

The forests grew just a few million years apart some 300 million years ago; and are now stacked one on top of another. It appears the ancient land experienced repeated periods of subsidence and flooding which buried the forests in a vertical sequence.Once the coal seams have been removed (what were, essentially, the compacted soils of the forests), it is possible to go into the tunnels and look up at what would have been lying on the forest floors.